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Inclusion

 2019 Rural Pulse™ Snapshot: Inclusion

Rural Pulse™ is a research study commissioned by the Grand Rapids-based Blandin Foundation to gain a real-time snapshot of the concerns, perceptions and priorities of rural Minnesota residents. It includes comparative findings from urban Minnesotans and identifies trends within significant, complex subject areas including the economy, education, employment and quality of life. Results are also analyzed as they relate to nine separate but inter-related dimensions of  a community’s health: life-long learning, inclusion, recreational and artistic opportunities, environmental stewardship, infrastructure and services, safety and security, community leadership, economic opportunity, spirituality and wellness.

Inclusion is…

One of the Nine Dimensions of a Healthy Community, inclusion is defined as: people consistently making the effort required to capitalize on the range of differences in the community, and intentionally seek ways to utilize the diverse backgrounds, experiences and skills of everyone for the benefit of the whole community.

____

Working Cohesively and Across Differences

When asked whether they feel local community members are able to work across differences to address local issues, only 13 percent of rural residents said that they feel their community does not, compared to 82 percent who said that they feel it does – a positive upturn of nine percentage points from 2016 study findings. Responses from Foundation home area residents were the same.

 

Residents in the Central and Southwest regions were the most likely to believe that their community works across differences for the betterment of the community.

 

 

Residents ages 18 to 24, those with incomes of more than $60,000 and business owners felt most positively about being able to work together to address local issues, despite differences.

 

 

Twenty-two percent of rural cultural/ racial community members did not agree that local residents are able to come together to address issues, compared to 74 percent who said that they feel it is. This is a positive upturn of five percentage points from 2016 study findings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

When asked how many of their close friends are of a different race or culture than themselves, nearly half (46%) of rural

Minnesotans agreed that at least some are. Even more urban Minnesotans (70%) cited close friendships within differing ethnic groups. Fifty-two percent of rural residents – and 29 percent of their urban counterparts – said that they had few, if any, close friends from other cultures.

 

Regionally, respondents in West Central Minnesota were the least likely to have reported diverse friendships. Those in the Central and Southwest regions cited the highest inclusivity within their personal inner circles.

 

 

 

Foundation home area residents were slightly less likely than rural

Minnesotans overall to report having at least some friends of a different race or culture (40%), compared to 46 percent of rural residents.

 

 

 

 

Personal demographics play a role as well. Men and residents ages 18 to 34 were more apt to be inclusive with regard to their close friendships.

 

 

Two-thirds (67%) of cultural/racial community members within rural Minnesota reported that they have at least some diversity in their close friendship circles. That was 24 percentage points higher than responding White residents (43%).

 

 

Rural Pulse study findings showed a slight increase from 2016 to 2019 in rural resident opinions about diversity within community leadership roles. More than half (54%) of rural residents – and 60 percent of urban Minnesotans – believed that local community leadership encompasses people from differing backgrounds; however, many still did not feel that this is the case (36% rural, 28% urban).

 

 

 

Northwest residents were the least likely to agree that local leadership is diverse.

 

 

A higher percentage of Foundation home area residents than overall rural Minnesotans (32% vs. 26%) disagreed that leadership roles in their community are held by people from diverse backgrounds.

 

 

 

 

 

Residents ages 50 to 64 and those with higher household incomes ($60,000+) in rural Minnesota were the least confident in local leadership inclusivity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rural Pulse study findings have remained steady from 2013 to 2019 in cultural/racial communities regarding their opinions about diversity within community leadership roles. Fifty-seven percent believed that local community leadership encompasses people from differing backgrounds. Thirty-five percent did not agree.

 

 

A new question for Rural Pulse 2019 was asking Minnesota residents, generally speaking, which groups of individuals they believe experience discrimination, bias or harassment within their community. Nearly four in 10 (38%) rural respondents believed that those with a drug or mental health issue were at the top of the list, followed by transgender individuals (35%), recent immigrants (31%) and gays and lesbians (29%). About one in four felt African Americans (26%), Native Americans (24%), the homeless (23%), liberals (23%), Hispanics (22%), people of different religious beliefs (22%) and conservatives (21%) are subjected to bias or harassment.

Groups that were seen as the least likely to experience discrimination were Asian Americans (16%), people with disabilities (15%) and Whites (14%). Three in 10 said none of the above, and three percent were unsure.

 

 

Rural business owners were more likely than those who don’t own a business to say they believe conservatives experience bias, discrimination or harassment (28% vs. 19% respectively).

 

 

Urban residents felt discrimination is more prevalent than those in rural Minnesota for nearly all groups queried. Those they see as most likely to experience bias or harassment are recent immigrants and African Americans (44% each), those with a drug or mental health issue (42%), homeless individuals (41%) and the transgender population (40%). Thirty-seven percent felt Hispanics experience discrimination, followed by gays/lesbians and Native Americans (35% each), different religions (31%), people with disabilities (30%), Asian Americans (28%) and those with conservative beliefs (27%). Urban respondents felt the least likely to experience such were Liberals (23%) and Whites (15%). About a quarter (26%) did not feel discrimination is experienced by any particular group, and four percent were unsure.

 

 

Responses varied somewhat by region. Individuals with a liberal political affiliation were felt to be one of the groups most likely to experience bias or harassment in the Northwest region. Residents in the southern part of the state felt Hispanics are a primary group that experiences discrimination. Those in the Southwest and Central regions added African Americans to the immediate list. Native Americans were felt to be a primary group who experience discrimination by those in the Northeast.

 

 

 

Those in the Foundation home area similarly identified groups in which they feel face discrimination.

 

 

 

Similar to rural Minnesotans overall, about four in 10 (38%) cultural/racial respondents in rural Minnesota identified those with a drug or mental health issue as most likely to experience negative treatment within their community, followed by African Americans (32%); transgender, gay and lesbian individuals and recent immigrants (31% each) and Native Americans (30%). Top responses for rural Whites included the same groups in a slightly different order.

 

 

Rural Cultural/Racial Residents:

 

The most notable differences were that rural Whites were less likely than cultural/racial residents to feel African Americans (26% and 32% respectively) and Native Americans (24% and 30% respectively) experience discrimination. Whites were less likely than their cultural/racial counterparts to feel that bias or harassment amongst any particular group exists, with 30 percent answering none to the question compared to 19 percent of cultural/racial community respondents.

When asked if they feel people in their community are able to stand up to hatred and discrimination if

they see it occur, more than eight in 10 (82%) rural

residents agreed. This is equivalent to the percentage of Foundation home area residents that felt the same. Twelve percent did not feel that individuals are able to stand up to discrimination and six percent were unsure. Urban residents had similar beliefs.

 

Residents in the Northwest and Southwest regions were less likely to have felt that community residents have the ability to stand up to discrimination if they see it happening. Those in West Central Minnesota held the highest confidence.

 

 

Demographically, men and younger residents were more likely to believe that empowerment against hatred is felt within their rural community.

 

About two-thirds (68%) of cultural/racial community members believed that people in their community are able to stand up to discrimination, compared to 83 percent of Whites. One in four (25%) disagreed.

 

 

 

 

 

About Rural Pulse

Rural Pulse™ is a research study commissioned by Blandin Foundation to gain a real-time snapshot of the concerns, perceptions and priorities of rural Minnesota residents. It has been conducted periodically since 1998, and was last conducted in 2016. It includes comparative findings from urban Minnesotans, and identifies trends within significant, complex subject areas including the economy, education, employment and quality of life. For this study, 1,068 telephone interviews were conducted with rural Minnesotans. View the full report at www.RuralPulse.org.

 

 

2019 RURAL PULSE™ SNAPSHOT: INCLUSION

Rural Pulse™ is a research study commissioned by the Grand Rapids-based Blandin Foundation to gain a real-time snapshot of the concerns, perceptions and priorities of rural Minnesota residents. It includes comparative findings from urban Minnesotans and identifies trends within significant, complex subject areas including the economy, education, employment and quality of life. Results are also analyzed as they relate to nine separate but inter-related dimensions of  a community’s health: life-long learning, inclusion, recreational and artistic opportunities, environmental stewardship, infrastructure and services, safety and security, community leadership, economic opportunity, spirituality and wellness.

 

INCLUSION IS …

One of the Nine Dimensions of a Healthy Community, inclusion is defined as: people consistently making the effort required to capitalize on the range of differences in the community, and intentionally seek ways to utilize the diverse backgrounds, experiences and skills of everyone for the benefit of the whole community.

____

 

Working Cohesively and Across Differences

When asked whether they feel local community members are able to work across differences to address local issues, only 13 percent of rural residents said that they feel their community does not, compared to 82 percent who said that they feel it does – a positive upturn of nine percentage points from 2016 study findings. Responses from Foundation home area residents were the same.

 

 

Residents in the Central and Southwest regions were the most likely to believe that their community

works across differences for the betterment of the community.

 

 

Residents ages 18 to 24, those with incomes of more than $60,000 and business owners felt most positively about being able to work together to address local issues, despite differences.

 

 

Twenty-two percent of rural cultural/ racial community members did not agree that local residents are able to come together to address issues, compared to 74 percent who said that they feel it is. This is a positive upturn of five percentage points from 2016 study findings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

When asked how many of their close friends are of a different race or culture than themselves, nearly half (46%) of rural

Minnesotans agreed that at least some are. Even more urban Minnesotans (70%) cited close friendships within differing ethnic groups. Fifty-two percent of rural residents – and 29 percent of their urban counterparts – said that they had few, if any, close friends from other cultures.

 

Regionally, respondents in West Central Minnesota were the least likely to have reported diverse friendships. Those in the Central and Southwest regions cited the highest inclusivity within their personal inner circles.

 

 

 

Foundation home area residents were slightly less likely than rural

Minnesotans overall to report having at least some friends of a different race or culture (40%), compared to 46 percent of rural residents.

 

 

 

 

Personal demographics play a role as well. Men and residents ages 18 to 34 were more apt to be inclusive with regard to their close friendships.

 

 

Two-thirds (67%) of cultural/racial community members within rural Minnesota reported that they have at least some diversity in their close friendship circles. That was 24 percentage points higher than responding White residents (43%).

 

 

Rural Pulse study findings showed a slight increase from 2016 to 2019 in rural resident opinions about diversity within community leadership roles. More than half (54%) of rural residents – and 60 percent of urban Minnesotans – believed that local community leadership encompasses people from differing backgrounds; however, many still did not feel that this is the case (36% rural, 28% urban).

 

 

 

Northwest residents were the least likely to agree that local leadership is diverse.

 

 

A higher percentage of Foundation home area residents than overall rural Minnesotans (32% vs. 26%) disagreed that leadership roles in their community are held by people from diverse backgrounds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residents ages 50 to 64 and those with higher household incomes ($60,000+) in rural Minnesota were the least confident in local leadership inclusivity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rural Pulse study findings have remained steady from 2013 to 2019 in cultural/racial communities regarding their opinions about diversity within community leadership roles. Fifty-seven percent believed that local community leadership encompasses people from differing backgrounds. Thirty-five percent did not agree.

 

 

A new question for Rural Pulse 2019 was asking Minnesota residents, generally speaking, which groups of individuals they believe experience discrimination, bias or harassment within their community. Nearly four in 10 (38%) rural respondents believed that those with a drug or mental health issue were at the top of the list, followed by transgender individuals (35%), recent immigrants (31%) and gays and lesbians (29%). About one in four felt African Americans (26%), Native Americans (24%), the homeless (23%), liberals (23%), Hispanics (22%), people of different religious beliefs (22%) and conservatives (21%) are subjected to bias or harassment.

Groups that were seen as the least likely to experience discrimination were Asian Americans (16%), people with disabilities (15%) and Whites (14%). Three in 10 said none of the above, and three percent were unsure.

 

 

Rural business owners were more likely than those who don’t own a business to say they believe conservatives experience bias, discrimination or harassment (28% vs. 19% respectively).

 

 

Urban residents felt discrimination is more prevalent than those in rural Minnesota for nearly all groups queried. Those they see as most likely to experience bias or harassment are recent immigrants and African Americans (44% each), those with a drug or mental health issue (42%), homeless individuals (41%) and the transgender population (40%). Thirty-seven percent felt Hispanics experience discrimination, followed by gays/lesbians and Native Americans (35% each), different religions (31%), people with disabilities (30%), Asian Americans (28%) and those with conservative beliefs (27%). Urban respondents felt the least likely to experience such were Liberals (23%) and Whites (15%). About a quarter (26%) did not feel discrimination is experienced by any particular group, and four percent were unsure.

 

 

Responses varied somewhat by region. Individuals with a liberal political affiliation were felt to be one of the groups most likely to experience bias or harassment in the Northwest region. Residents in the southern part of the state felt Hispanics are a primary group that experiences discrimination. Those in the Southwest and Central regions added African Americans to the immediate list. Native Americans were felt to be a primary group who experience discrimination by those in the Northeast.

 

 

 

Those in the Foundation home area similarly identified groups in which they feel face discrimination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Similar to rural Minnesotans overall, about four in 10 (38%) cultural/racial respondents in rural Minnesota identified those with a drug or mental health issue as most likely to experience negative treatment within their community, followed by African Americans (32%); transgender, gay and lesbian individuals and recent immigrants (31% each) and Native Americans (30%). Top responses for rural Whites included the same groups in a slightly different order.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rural Cultural/Racial Residents:

 

The most notable differences were that rural Whites were less likely than cultural/racial residents to feel African Americans (26% and 32% respectively) and Native Americans (24% and 30% respectively) experience discrimination. Whites were less likely than their cultural/racial counterparts to feel that bias or harassment amongst any particular group exists, with 30 percent answering none to the question compared to 19 percent of cultural/racial community respondents.

When asked if they feel people in their community are able to stand up to hatred and discrimination if

they see it occur, more than eight in 10 (82%) rural

residents agreed. This is equivalent to the percentage of Foundation home area residents that felt the same. Twelve percent did not feel that individuals are able to stand up to discrimination and six percent were unsure. Urban residents had similar beliefs.

 

Residents in the Northwest and Southwest regions were less likely to have felt that community residents have the ability to stand up to discrimination if they see it happening. Those in West Central Minnesota held the highest confidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Demographically, men and younger residents were more likely to believe that empowerment against hatred is felt within their rural community.

 

About two-thirds (68%) of cultural/racial community members believed that people in their community are able to stand up to discrimination, compared to 83 percent of Whites. One in four (25%) disagreed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Rural Pulse

Rural Pulse™ is a research study commissioned by Blandin Foundation to gain a real-time snapshot of the concerns, perceptions and priorities of rural Minnesota residents. It has been conducted periodically since 1998, and was last conducted in 2016. It includes comparative findings from urban Minnesotans, and identifies trends within significant, complex subject areas including the economy, education, employment and quality of life. For this study, 1,068 telephone interviews were conducted with rural Minnesotans. View the full report at www.RuralPulse.org.

Rural Pulse
Back to Rural Pulse 2019 Home  ·  Authored by Russell Herder. Published 2019.
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